The Abolition of Men? Mass shootings and the erosion of virtue

Over at CBMW.org, I published my thoughts in the wake of two more mass shootings in America — and why I believe there is something sick with the American male. Here's an excerpt: Western civilization has historically recognized four cardinal or natural virtues, affirmed by august thinkers from Plato and Cicero to Ambrose, Aquinas, and … Continue reading The Abolition of Men? Mass shootings and the erosion of virtue

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A response to Michael Wear in the NYT: Pro-Lifers should be wary of empty pro-life rhetoric

The good folks over at Public Discourse graciously published my response to Michael Wear's op-ed in the New York Times. Wear is a self-described pro-life Democrat who is calling Democrat candidates back from radical positions on abortion. The problem is, as I argue in the piece, the Democratic candidates' positions are essentially indistinct from the current Democratic Party platform, … Continue reading A response to Michael Wear in the NYT: Pro-Lifers should be wary of empty pro-life rhetoric

Economics, upward mobility, and the power of the intact family

The Atlantic has a fascinating article in its August 2019 issue on world-renown economist Raj Chetty and the work he is doing on generational opportunity and the stalled-out American dream. Chetty was born in New Dheli, India, and emigrated to America at age 9, where he was afforded many opportunities he took advantage of to climb … Continue reading Economics, upward mobility, and the power of the intact family

The Pre-Persons: Philip K. Dick’s pro-life short story

Past the grove of cypress trees Walter -- he had been playing king of the mountain -- saw the white truck, and he knew it for what it was. He thought, That's the abortion truck. Come to take some kid in for a postpartum down at the abortion place. And he thought, Maybe my folks … Continue reading The Pre-Persons: Philip K. Dick’s pro-life short story

Herman Bavinck on Concupiscence

The following excerpts are taken from the third volume of Herman Bavinck's Reformed Dogmatics, wherein Bavinck elaborates on the Reformed view of sin and salvation in Christ. In these two excerpts, Bavinck makes the case that the historic Reformed position on concupiscence is that "the impure thoughts and desires (concupiscence) that arose in us prior … Continue reading Herman Bavinck on Concupiscence

Revoice in their own voice

Much controversy has swirled around the upcoming Revoice conference being held at a PCA church in St. Louis on July 26–28. Here is its stated purpose: "Supporting, encouraging, and empowering gay, lesbian, same-sex-attracted, and other LGBT Christians so they can flourish while observing the historic, Christian doctrine of marriage and sexuality." A number of writers have signaled … Continue reading Revoice in their own voice

Miscellany 10-24-17 (Virtue, Feminism, Industrialization, Marriage, US Birth Rate)

C.S. Lewis, "Men Without Chests" On virtue: It still remains true that no justification of virtue will enable a man to be virtuous. Without the aid of trained emotions the intellect is powerless against the animal organism. I had sooner play cards against a man who was quite sceptical about ethics, but bred to believe … Continue reading Miscellany 10-24-17 (Virtue, Feminism, Industrialization, Marriage, US Birth Rate)

Miscellany 10-17-17 (Fatherhood, Motherhood, Capital Punishment, Faith and Works, Conservatism, Nationalism)

Reclaiming a Father’s Presence at Home, Institute for Family Studies (John A. Cuddeback) It is the stock-in-trade of defenders of the traditional household to decry the general movement of women out of the household and into the “workforce.” Most, however, are mute on the issue of the parallel and prior male exodus. And yet the … Continue reading Miscellany 10-17-17 (Fatherhood, Motherhood, Capital Punishment, Faith and Works, Conservatism, Nationalism)

Things I’m Reading 9/23/17

If you haven't discovered this little online gem yet, allow me introduce you to Alastair Roberts's "Curious Cat" account (don't be turned off by the name—or the bizarro anime glamcat icons). For the past few weeks Roberts has been running a clinic on how to engage in online discourse as he answers anonymous questions about, well, … Continue reading Things I’m Reading 9/23/17

Victor Hugo, Waterloo, and the Providence of God

Excerpted from Victor Hugo, Les Miserables, trans. Charles E. Wilbour (New York: Modern Library, 1992), 288. "Was it possible that Napoleon should win [the battle of Waterloo]? We answer no. Why? Because of Wellington? Because of Blücher? No. Because of God. For Bonaparte to be conqueror at Waterloo was not in the law of the … Continue reading Victor Hugo, Waterloo, and the Providence of God