The Abolition of Men? Mass shootings and the erosion of virtue

Over at CBMW.org, I published my thoughts in the wake of two more mass shootings in America — and why I believe there is something sick with the American male. Here's an excerpt: Western civilization has historically recognized four cardinal or natural virtues, affirmed by august thinkers from Plato and Cicero to Ambrose, Aquinas, and … Continue reading The Abolition of Men? Mass shootings and the erosion of virtue

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A response to Michael Wear in the NYT: Pro-Lifers should be wary of empty pro-life rhetoric

The good folks over at Public Discourse graciously published my response to Michael Wear's op-ed in the New York Times. Wear is a self-described pro-life Democrat who is calling Democrat candidates back from radical positions on abortion. The problem is, as I argue in the piece, the Democratic candidates' positions are essentially indistinct from the current Democratic Party platform, … Continue reading A response to Michael Wear in the NYT: Pro-Lifers should be wary of empty pro-life rhetoric

Economics, upward mobility, and the power of the intact family

The Atlantic has a fascinating article in its August 2019 issue on world-renown economist Raj Chetty and the work he is doing on generational opportunity and the stalled-out American dream. Chetty was born in New Dheli, India, and emigrated to America at age 9, where he was afforded many opportunities he took advantage of to climb … Continue reading Economics, upward mobility, and the power of the intact family

Miscellany 10-24-17 (Virtue, Feminism, Industrialization, Marriage, US Birth Rate)

C.S. Lewis, "Men Without Chests" On virtue: It still remains true that no justification of virtue will enable a man to be virtuous. Without the aid of trained emotions the intellect is powerless against the animal organism. I had sooner play cards against a man who was quite sceptical about ethics, but bred to believe … Continue reading Miscellany 10-24-17 (Virtue, Feminism, Industrialization, Marriage, US Birth Rate)

Miscellany 10-17-17 (Fatherhood, Motherhood, Capital Punishment, Faith and Works, Conservatism, Nationalism)

Reclaiming a Father’s Presence at Home, Institute for Family Studies (John A. Cuddeback) It is the stock-in-trade of defenders of the traditional household to decry the general movement of women out of the household and into the “workforce.” Most, however, are mute on the issue of the parallel and prior male exodus. And yet the … Continue reading Miscellany 10-17-17 (Fatherhood, Motherhood, Capital Punishment, Faith and Works, Conservatism, Nationalism)

Things I’m Reading 9/23/17

If you haven't discovered this little online gem yet, allow me introduce you to Alastair Roberts's "Curious Cat" account (don't be turned off by the name—or the bizarro anime glamcat icons). For the past few weeks Roberts has been running a clinic on how to engage in online discourse as he answers anonymous questions about, well, … Continue reading Things I’m Reading 9/23/17

Victor Hugo, Waterloo, and the Providence of God

Excerpted from Victor Hugo, Les Miserables, trans. Charles E. Wilbour (New York: Modern Library, 1992), 288. "Was it possible that Napoleon should win [the battle of Waterloo]? We answer no. Why? Because of Wellington? Because of Blücher? No. Because of God. For Bonaparte to be conqueror at Waterloo was not in the law of the … Continue reading Victor Hugo, Waterloo, and the Providence of God

The Unraveling of the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife

Sometimes when you tug a presenting yarn, it all comes unraveled. Do you remember the Harvard professor Karen King, who overturned aeons of church teaching and history with one tiny papyrus fragment, the one that "evidenced" early Christian belief that Jesus had a wife? If not, here is the triumphalist announcement from a few years back proclaiming the … Continue reading The Unraveling of the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife

Debating the Trinity

As you have probably noticed, a spirited trinitarian debate is currently taking place on the interwebs. Contributions have come ab intra and ab extra the Reformed complementarian camp (see what I did there?), and they mainly revolve around the question of the Eternal Functional Subordination (EFS) of the Son. Here's a quick summary of the issues, and … Continue reading Debating the Trinity

Biblical Theology and Theological Interpretation of Scripture

NB: This is an essay I wrote for one of my PhD comprehensive exams, which I had to complete within a time limit and without any sources—hence the missing footnotes. If ever I have time in the future, I'd like to revisit it and shore up my assertions with beefy citations. Until then, I hope you … Continue reading Biblical Theology and Theological Interpretation of Scripture